Helping people transform themselves

We have a duty of care to set people up for a future that won’t look like it does now.

Sam:

Welcome to Sustainable Lens, Resilience on Radio, a weekly show on sustainability topics brought to you by Otago Polytechnic. This show is co-hosted by Shane Gallagher, who’s not here tonight that’s why I’m driving and me, Samuel Mann. Each week we talk with someone who’s making a positive difference in applying their skills to a positive future. In our conversations, we try to find out what motivates them and what it means to see the world through a sustainable perspective, through their sustainable lens. Tonight’s sustainable lens is that of Glenys Ker who is a colleague of mine. She variously describes herself as a career practitioner, educator and she has got more degrees than anybody. I think it’s seven and she is almost at the point of having a doctorate of Professional Studies because it’s getting submitted in the very near future. Welcome.

 

Glenys:

Thank you.

 

Sam:

Where did you grow up?

 

Glenys:

Geraldine.

 

Sam:

What was it like growing up in Geraldine?

 

Glenys:

It’s the perfect childhood, small town, everybody knew each other, everybody did everything together so lots of sports, church, guides. Yeah, great growing up.

 

Sam:

What were your parents doing in Geraldine?

 

Glenys:

My dad was self-employed. He was a milk vendor. My mum was a nurse, palliative care nurse.

 

Sam:

What did you want to be when you grow up?

 

Glenys:

At what age?

 

Sam:

Early teenage, getting past the astronaut and the train driver.

 

Glenys:

The dancer and the fairy. I probably wanted to be a nurse, but my mum was a nurse so at the teenage years, you don’t do what your mother is so, I decided I’d be a teacher.

 

Sam:

What did you think that being a teacher would let you achieve?

 

Glenys:

One of the first things I liked about teaching was all those holidays, but I had some really good role models as teachers at Geraldine High School and I loved the way they influenced young people so, I think primarily, it was if I could influence people that appealed to me.

 

Sam:

You went off to Teachers College?

 

Glenys:

I did a one-year course at then community college, Timaru, South Canterbury Community College in Secretarial Studies so accounting, business management type stuff. Did a stint in those days, work experience as a legal secretary and while I loved that life, I didn’t like the role of the secretary. While I was there at polytech, the teacher was sick and I said, “I’ll take the class.” Unbeknown to me, the people from teacher training college were there and that is really how I got into teaching because they thought I was the teacher. I went off and did … What was it called in those days? Commerce, I guess. Yeah, so I went off to training college. It was a bit of luck really.

 

Sam:

Did the teaching education deliver on what you hoped it would?

 

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